The Soviet

absinthemakeyouawhore:

Soviet women volunteers sent to the front in the summer of 1941.

absinthemakeyouawhore:

Soviet women volunteers sent to the front in the summer of 1941.

(Source: kawakuborei)

friendlynapalm:

Three Soviet Guerrillas in action in Russia during WWII

friendlynapalm:

Three Soviet Guerrillas in action in Russia during WWII

eupraxsophy:

Today is Victory Day, also known simply as the 9th of May, in which Nazi Germany capitulated to Soviet forces, bringing an end to the war in Europe. Known to many Russians as the “Great Patriotic War,” the conflict was won at a tremendous cost: the Eastern Front was by far the largest and bloodiest theatre of World War II, and the deadliest conflict in human history, claiming the lives of over 30 million people (half or more being civilians).

Soviet Russia lost at least 9 million soldiers, a third of them in Axis captivity, and just as many civilians, if not more. Some sources suggest that as many as 17 to 27 million Soviet citizens were killed, while others have calculated that perhaps as many as 20 million Soviet civilians lost their lives. By comparison, the United States lost over a quarter of a million men for the entire war, and fewer than a 3,000 civilians, while the Germans lost 5 million troops on the Eastern Front (and perhaps another 1 to 2 million civilians when the Russians invaded). So many young men were killed that the USSR’s population was nearly 50 million less than it should have been, given the families that these men would’ve had. To this day, many former Soviet states have an imbalance between men and women, having not fully recovered from the scale of dead men.

This is a scale of carnage and death that is difficult to grasp. Think of all the pain and suffering caused by loss of several thousand troops in Iraq and Afghanistan (to say nothing of the hundreds of thousands of Iraqis and Afghans). Now amplify that anguish by several million, with nearly 20% of some countries wiped out (namely Russia and Poland). The human mind simply can’t process that level of death. How the Soviets managed to move on and rebuild is beyond me.

And while the Soviet Union came out of World War II victorious, was economically and structurally devastated. Much of the combat took place in or around densely populated areas, and the brutal actions of both sides contributed to massive loss destruction. The property damage inflicted on the USSR by the Axis invasion was estimated at a cost 679 billion rubles, probably a trillion or more dollars by today’s standards. The Siege of a single city, Leningrad, alone cost 1.2 million lives. That fight over another city, Stalingrad, cost a similar number of lives and by some accounts became the single largest battle in history (not to mention a turning point in the entire war).

In all, the combined damage consisted of complete or partial destruction of 1,710 cities and towns, 70,000 villages/hamlets, 2,508 church buildings, 31,850 industrial establishments, 40,000 miles of railroad, 4100 railroad stations, 40,000 hospitals, 84,000 schools, and 43,000 public libraries. Over 20 million sheep, goats, horses, and other cattle were also slaughtered or driven off. Western Russia, as well Ukraine and Belarus, still bear signs of this devastation (in some cases, fragments of bone and metal have been dug up, though that also happens in Western Europe occasionally).

There is no denying that this sacrifice was instrumental in winning the war. The Russians were dealing with around 85% of Axis forces, and German armed forces suffered anywhere from 80 to 93 percent of its military deaths in the Eastern Front. If the USSR had capitulated, Allied forces would’ve had to contend with a lot more resistance. The war would’ve been far bloodier and more drawn out. The Russians nearly bled themselves dry in our place.

But this wasn’t merely the result of bravery and stereotypical Russian resoluteness (though those were certainly factors). The markedly brutal nature of warfare on the Eastern Front was the result of the often willful disregard for human life by both sides: Hitler and Stalin each used terror and mass murder to further their aims, and had no qualms about leading millions to their deaths in the name of victory. This included victimizing their own troops and civilians, through mass deportation, threats of execution for cowardice, and human wave attacks.

And keep in mind that all this is in addition to atrocities carried out by the Nazis, including routine massacres of civilians and the brick-by-brick destruction of entire communities (and their inhabitants). There was simply no parallel to this on the Western Front. According to Time:

“By measure of manpower, duration, territorial reach and casualties, the Eastern Front was as much as four times the scale of the conflict on the Western Front that opened with the Normandy invasion.”

The fact is, as monstrous as Stalin was, and as brutal as the Soviets tended to be (before, during, and after the war), we arguably needed that kind of viciousness on our side in order to win. To put it crudely, Soviet Russia was the bad cop in the war. It took playing Hitler at his own cruel game to put a stop to him, and only the USSR was willing and able to do so. Such is the nature of war. The horror and destruction of the Eastern Front proves exemplifies, in the most extreme example, the fact that most conflicts are hardly black-and-white, nor are they matters of honor and glory. It’s simply about winning in whatever way you can, period. There’s no romanticizing that, although we can certainly do so for the average Soviet soldier who was mixed up in all this, and fought valiantly to the end.

All this stands in contrast to the Allied experience. We Americans could remember the conflict very different, simply because our conduct and memory of the war was much cleaner – we were a democracy fighting a conventional conflict against a fraction of the enemy’s forces. We weren’t occupied and invaded.* We didn’t need to use heartless and self-destructive tactics (nor could we, given the vast differences in the ethics of our political and military leadership).

I’m in no way denigrating our contribution to the war effort, especially considering that we did provide many useful supplies to the beleaguered USSR (at least until they got their own industry back on line). And we pretty much fought the Japanese single handedly (although the Russians and Chinese played a much underrated role in that effort as well). I’m simply noting the obvious fact that World War II couldn’t have been won without the Soviet Union, at least not without investing far more of our own blood, money, and time. It’s very unfortunate that few people outside of Russia seem to realize that – as if the sacrifice itself wasn’t horrific enough, it’s barely even acknowledged.

So while the Russians, as well as other Europeans, celebrate their hard-fought victory over Nazi oppression, there’s a level of somberness that underlies all that glory that we can barely relate with. They’ll keep on romanticizing of course, as humans are wont to do. And indeed, the typical soldier deserves it. But we mustn’t forget just how messy and gray most of these conflicts tend to be. With all that said, my heart goes out to the tens of millions of men, women, and even children who fought and died in the single most horrific conflict in human history.

shamone-baby:

VICTORY DAY
Память бессмертна.Спасибо всем тем,кто сражался за наше настоящее и будущее.
Memory is immortal.Thank you to all those who fought for our present and future.

shamone-baby:

VICTORY DAY

Память бессмертна.
Спасибо всем тем,кто сражался за наше настоящее и будущее.

Memory is immortal.
Thank you to all those who fought for our present and future.

CONTINUATION OF THE LEGEND OF LECH, CZECH, AND RUS….

ksiazemakow:

ok well first of all i think kievan rus’ now lives in ivan’s basement js :^(

it kind of sucked for Rus (or Kievan Rus’) that Lech and Czech got the awesome territory. Here he was stuck in this suckish, snowy hell where he was sure he was going to die. :^( And there would be absolutely NO help from Lech and Czech because they were stupid siblings who were in Lala Land over in their nice lands. HE PROMISED HIMSELF THAT IF HE SURVIVED, HE WOULD TAKE REVENGE….

YEARSLATER. Kievan Rus’ has a son that will soon take his place. He names the child Russia.

“Russia, my son…..” Kievan Rus’ whispered, “you must continue my quest to take revenge upon Lech and Czech, who are now Czechia and Poland…. Do you understand? You must FUCK THEM OVER IN THE UTMOST OF WAYS.”

Russia, who was eager to continue his father’s work, promised himself he would fuck Lech and Czech over.

And that is why Russia hates Poland and the Czech Republic (who ended up having the most suckish locations in Europe in the end, AND their other sibling, Kievan Rus’, ended up having his son become a super power).

“Screw you, Kievan Rus’„„ Screw you„„,” Poland and Czechia whisper to Russia’s basement.

(Source: ksiazemakowdeleted)

fyeaheasterneurope:

In celebration of 1 May!
I like how everyone is wearing different folk costumes - you can see that they represent different traditions from around the USSR. If Russian isn’t your strong suit, the word МИР (pronounced “mir”) on the banner in the back means “peace”.

fyeaheasterneurope:

In celebration of 1 May!

I like how everyone is wearing different folk costumes - you can see that they represent different traditions from around the USSR. If Russian isn’t your strong suit, the word МИР (pronounced “mir”) on the banner in the back means “peace”.

darlingtsarevich:

kralovnapiva:

fyeaheasterneurope:

Happy 142nd birthday to all time top revolutionary, Vladimir Lenin! 

…

darlingtsarevich:

kralovnapiva:

fyeaheasterneurope:

Happy 142nd birthday to all time top revolutionary, Vladimir Lenin! 

fyeaheasterneurope:

One of the stranger manifestations of Soviet messaging in the 1950s and 1960s was the use of silviculture propaganda: giant signs created in fields and forests by carefully-planted plots of trees. Back in the mid-20th century, these were presumably thought of as tokens to be seen by future generations from communist spaceships above the earth.

The content of the messages were fairly simple, but they are still visible today. And through Google Maps, anyone can now see them, even decades after their aspirational creation.

From here.

"

On April 12, in 1919, fifteen workers from the Moskva-Sortirovochnaya rail yard repaired three steam locomotives in one Saturday night without any compensation. Their deed appealed to Vladimir Lenin and he called this concept a “great initiative”. Since then, a “Subbotnik” or “Communist Subbotnik” (derived from the Russian word for Saturday - Subbota) became a frequent day for voluntary work in Soviet life.

Lenin wrote in an article, describing the “communist subbotnik” as being of huge historical importance because it demonstrates the conscious and voluntary initiative of workers in transition to a new type of labor discipline. The article states “All these are the sprouts of communism, and it is our public and foremost responsibility to care for these sprouts”.

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